Course Descriptions

RTA Courses

NOTE 1: The official and most up-to-date listing of courses offered by the RTA School of Media can be found in the Ryerson University Undergraduate Calendar.

NOTE 2:  The course syllabi below are NOT to be considered the official syllabus for the course. Students are advised to obtain the official course syllabus directly from the professor or from the official course website in Blackboard.

NOTE 3: Not all courses are offered in every semester. For the list of when courses are offered, see Course Availability.

NOTE 4: Please also see the list of Courses Required to Graduate.

 

BDC 102 Media Writing I – Audio and Digital Media
This laboratory course introduces students to the various formats, styles and approaches used in broadcast writing, with a focus on writing for radio and interactive media. Students will learn about research, interviewing, and composing scripts, with a focus on building an introductory portfolio of written material in both the fields of audio and digital media (including news reports, commentaries, commercials, and public service announcements). (2 hours) Course Syllabus for BDC 102

BDC 111 Media Tech Theory I – Audio and Digital Media
This lecture course will introduce analog audio systems, an overview of visual media representation systems, computer hardware, and a survey of network and digital media technologies with a special emphasis on understanding the computer’s role in audio and digital media production. The course will be taught at a non-engineering level. Lectures will include samples of technology and demonstrations. (2 hours) Course Syllabus for BDC 111

BDC 191 Audio Production I
Students will learn the basics of audio production and radio broadcasting. Through a combination of lecture and in-studio workshops, students will learn to use digital technologies for producing radio spots, planning and executing radio programs, and creating sound effects, and will develop an appreciation for the role of sound in media. (BDC 191 and BDC 192 replace former course BDC 101). (3 hours) Course Syllabus for BDC 191

BDC 192 Digital Media Production I
Through a combination of lecture and hands-on workshops, students will be introduced to principles of visual design and will learn how to use digital media production software for graphic design, animation, interactivity, and web media. (BDC 191 and BDC 192 replace former course BDC 101).  (3 hours)Students working in the digital media lab Course Syllabus for 192 2012

BDC 201 Media Production II – TV Studio and EFP
Students will gain a practical working knowledge of operational techniques, including hands-on equipment training with cameras, lighting, sound and editing equipment. Emphasis will be also placed on crew roles and responsibilities. Theory lectures will analyze the process of communicating information and emotion through visuals and sound. Production planning techniques will be taught to help students organize their creative ideas. (6 hours) Corequisites: BDC 202 and BDC 211 Course Syllabus for BDC 201 EFP  Course Syllabus for BDC 201 Studio Lab   BDC 201 Media Production Studio LECTURE W2013

BDC 202 Media Writing II – TV Studio and EFP
Students taking this course will be introduced to the various styles and script formats currently used in writing for television. Students will learn about research, interviewing, and composing scripts, with a focus on building an introductory portfolio of written material for television (including news reports, commentaries, commercials, and public service announcements). (2 hours) BDC 202 (2013) – Course Outline

BDC 210 Broadcast History
This course is an overview of the institutional, technological and social history of broadcasting. A survey of broadcast pioneers will reveal the major models of public and private radio which provided the foundation for radio and television as we know it today. The roles of the CRBC, CBC, BBG and CRTC in the Canadian broadcasting scene will be explored along with an overview of private broadcasting to shape a view of the present Canadian broadcast industry. (3 hours) Course Syllabus BDC 210

BDC 211 Media Tech Theory II – TV Studio and EFP
This lecture series will explain the mechanical, electronic, and operational principles of the principal pieces of technology associated with single camera (EFP) and multicamera television productions. The focus will be on various technologies and functions and how they are applied in the television medium. The course will be taught at a non-engineering level. Lectures will include samples of technology and demonstrations. (2 hours) Course Outline BDC 211

BDC 301 Production – Audio
Building on the audio skills acquired in BDC 101 or BDC 191, this course continues to introduce students to various audio production practices. Through a series of guided workshops and assignments in a supervised laboratory, students will produce content for a variety of audio delivery systems. Students will develop their knowledge of audio production tools, and gain an understanding of the teamwork and interpersonal skills necessary to create successful audio and radio productions. (6 hours) Prerequisites: (BDC 101 or BDC 191) and BDC 111 Course Syllabus for BDC 301

BDC 302 Production – Digital Media
This course is designed to offer an introduction in the theory and practice of content-production in the digital age, with hands-on work in motion graphics using digital and traditional media. The course involves lectures, group critiques, field trips, in-class workshops, production exercises and work time. Students are expected to participate in all aspects of design from research and planning to design and production, and finally to presentation of work. (6 hours) Prerequisites: (BDC 101 or BDC 192) and BDC 111  Course Syllabus for BDC 302

BDC 303 Production – TV Studio
This course provides students with more advanced understanding and practice in multi-camera/studio production techniques. Through skill-based workshop rotations, studio production exercises and a major project, students develop their knowledge of production tools, operation and care of equipment, and an understanding of the teamwork and interpersonal skills necessary to create successful programming. As well, the skill set and talent necessary to use the visual medium to tell effective and evocative stories is further developed. (6 hours) Prerequisites: BDC 201 and BDC 211  Course Syllabus for BDC 303 Student in the Sets Room

BDC 304 Production – EFP
This course advances the student’s knowledge and applications of lighting, framing, composition, location constraints, sound, and the power of editing involved in single camera shooting. Students will review the camera/recorder and non-linear edit suites, the planning techniques derived from scripts, lighting techniques and audio recording. Students will develop story, scripts and production planning paperwork for one short and one longer form production, which they will shoot and edit. (6 hours) Prerequisites: BDC 201 and BDC 211  Course Syllabus for BDC 304

BDC 310 Information Gathering and Research Methods
This course will introduce a wide range of research techniques and methodologies used in broadcasting. Topics will include the fundamentals of research, information gathering and story producing for broadcast, sources and credibility, mass audiences and techniques to evaluate broadcast programs including BBM and Nielsen. Research methods to be reviewed will include quantitative and qualitative techniques; survey design; focus group technique; ethnographic, behavioural, discourse and textual analysis; political, economic and institutional research; and experimental design. (2 hours) Course Syllabus for BDC 310

BDC 311 Communications Theory
This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of communication theory including media literacy and the encoding and decoding of messages in the media. A broad variety of important theorists will be reviewed, as will concepts of Canadian nationalism, globalized media, digital media, and internet theory. Contemporary examples of many types of media will be analyzed to show the impact of theory on the practical delivery of messages.  Course Syllabus for BDC 311

BDC 401 Design in Media
This course will introduce students to design in many forms of media and show how design has an important impact on their creative productions. Students will be introduced to design in painting, sculpture, music, furniture, fashion, architecture, television, Web media, print, drama, dance, industrial products, and film. Design movements will be explored and related to contemporary communications products. (2 hours)  Course Outline BDC 401

BDC 402 Business Practices in Creative Media
This course reviews traditional and evolving business practices within various creative media industries. Focus will be placed on understanding operational aspects and how each sector functions. From a business perspective, the course will review the structure of these industries as well as specific-sector and common cross-sector issues. The impact of emerging technologies, regulations, cultural versus economic priorities, trends, business challenges and opportunities in the digital age will also be addressed. (2 hours)  Course Outline BDC 402

BDC 601 Advanced Production – Audio
This course is an advanced masterclass for students specializing in Audio. Building on the basic and intermediate training in the first and second years of the program, this course will explore the theory and practice of Advanced Audio Production. The course will include discussion of the history of audio and focus on the aesthetics of quality audio, and applying these principles to senior-level production assignments. (6 hours)  Prerequisite: BDC 301  Course Syllabus BDC 601

BDC 602 Advanced Production – Digital Media
This course is an advanced masterclass for students specializing in interactive digital media. Building on the basic and intermediate training in the first and second years of the program, this course will explore the theory and practice of Advanced Interactive Media Production. It will include discussion of the history of interactive media and focus on the aesthetics of quality interactive media content. Students will learn advanced interactive media theory and apply these principles in production assignments. (6 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 302  Course Syllabus BDC 602

BDC 603 Advanced Production – TV Studio
This course is an advanced masterclass for students specializing in television studio production. Building on the basic and intermediate training in the first and second years of the program, this course will explore the theory and practice of television studio production. It will include discussion of the history of TV studio production and focus on the aesthetics of quality content. Students will learn advanced TV studio theory and apply these principles in production assignments. (6 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 303 Course Syllabus BDC 603

BDC 604 Advanced Production – EFP
This course will concentrate primarily on the aesthetic and production values of the video image, complimented by the progressive investigation of high definition and lighting technologies. This class will use lectures guest speakers, facility and production tours and practical exercises. We will investigate the nature of light, colour and the perception of colour, motion, and the compositional elements of dimensionality, visualization and perspective in traditional and high definition production. (6 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 304 Course Syllabus BDC 604

BDC 701 Practicum I – Pre-Production and Production
Students self-select into groups to produce professional quality audio, television, or multimedia projects. Students engage the support of external industry mentors as well as RTA faculty and pitch production ideas to a Practicum Management Committee. Practicum ideas must meet professional industry standards. (6 hours)  Course Syllabus BDC 701

BDC 710 Senior Capstone Lectures I
In this course, students analyze and discuss the current and future overarching issues within the creative and cultural industries, placing them in context within the Canadian milieu. Senior representatives of various media and faculty members will present and discuss topics from their respective fields of expertise. Students will gain insights into opportunities and challenges in the workplace, trends and the impact of emerging technologies on all sectors with particular focus on content creation. (2 hours)  Course Syllabus for BDC 710

BDC 790 Major Research Paper I
This course provides a place for students writing major research papers to refine their writing under the guidance of faculty with advanced scholarly research and writing skills. Included is an advanced library class, an overview of creative approaches to writing a scholarly paper, individual feedback sessions, work-shopping/peer review and discussion of ways of disseminating academic writing. Students create means of making their work available to the RTA community at the conclusion of the course. (6 hours) View most recent course syllabus

BDC 801 Practicum II – Production and Post-Production
A continuation of BDC 701 in which students continue to work on the productions they began in that course. Engaging the support of external industry mentors as well as RTA faculty, production groups focus on their project’s final production phase, as well as on post-production, and the screening (or broadcast) and marketing of their work. (9 hours)  Prerequisite: BDC 701   Production Practicum HandbookRTA students

BDC 820 Internship
With faculty support, students find themselves six-week intensive internships in the media, media production and related industries. Students develop personal contracts with industry mentors to carry out significant research or gain industry work experience off campus. The Internship is intended to encourage students to explore their particular career interests. Corequisite: BDC 801 Course Syllabus for BDC 820

BDC 821 Special Project
Working individually or in groups, students will engage in an original practical or traditional academic thesis project in their area of interest. With a faculty advisor, students will choose a thesis area such as audio, video, writing, interactive media, business, management or traditional communications research. Once a project has been approved, students will develop contacts with external mentors and complete an advanced paper or practical audio, video or interactive media project. (12 hours) Corequisite: BDC 801  Course Syllabus BDC 821

BDC 890 Major Research Paper II
This course provides a place for students writing major research papers to refine their writing under the guidance of faculty with advanced scholarly research and writing skills. Included is an advanced library class, an overview of creative approaches to writing a scholarly paper, individual feedback sessions, work-shopping/peer review and discussion of ways of disseminating academic writing. Students create means of making their work available to the RTA community at the conclusion of the course. (9 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 790

BDC 901 Advertising in Electronic Media
Students will follow a commercial production from inception to completion. Aspects of advertising to be reviewed include: competitive bidding by agencies; budgeting for commercial production; relationships with production houses; CRTC regulations and broadcaster advertisement codes; and the role of various personnel involved in the bidding, pre-production, production and post-production stages of a commercial. Effectiveness and persuasiveness of commercial content will be explored. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus BDC 901

BDC 902 Electronic Media Sales
This course emphasizes the role that the sales function plays in media companies. Drawing from the traditional media of radio and television, the course will also extend into the new media businesses as they appear and penetrate the communications landscape. Selling will be explored as a career, touching on elements such as research, promotion, negotiating purchases of time, and management sales support structures. Student will prepare and present broadcast sales plans. (3 hours) View most recent course syllabus

BDC 903 News and Current Affairs Theory
This course examines the underlying assumptions and theories about news and current affairs programming in Canada and around the world. Students will look at the structure of the industry, the perceived and actual impact of this sector of broadcast media and meet with guests drawn from the national media world. Students will examine demographic impacts on audiences, shifts in interests, external and internal criticism and compare and contrast story development and coverage on competing media. (3 hours) Course Syllabus BDC 903

BDC 904 Advanced Media Management
In this course, students will learn about organizational behaviour. Topics will include theories of employee motivation, individual behaviour, interpersonal and organizational communication, perception and personality in organizations, work attitudes and values, team dynamics and effectiveness, organizational power and politics, conflict and negotiation, leadership, and stress management. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 402  Course Syllabus for BDC 904

BDC 905 The Business of Music
This course will explore how the music industry is organized, and how music is used in radio, television, film, and advertising. Topics include AandR, marketing, promotion, sales, artist relations, new media, business affairs, finance/royalties, manufacturing, distribution, contracts, and getting a record and video made. It will also explore the roles of artists, managers, songwriters, unions, publishers, producers, and engineers. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus for BDC 905

BDC 906 Media Marketing and Promotion
This course will provide the foundation of knowledge and procedures associated with effective marketing and promotion techniques for various media properties. Specific areas of discussion may include brand identity, strategies and tactics for on-air promotion and campaigns, off-air and out-of-home advertising, publicity, promotional partnerships, etc. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus BDC 906

BDC 907 Television Programming
This course examines the programming strategies of television Networks, specialty and pay services. Students will learn about the decision-making processes and research methods utilized in program development, selection, promotion and scheduling. The course will examine the internal and external factors which affect programming. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus for BDC 907

BDC 908 Business Aspects of Independent Production I
This course explores the role of the independent producer and the business and legal activities and materials necessary to produce independent production. Students learn about relationships with broadcasters and funding agencies, as well as program proposal preparation, creating business plans and effective pitching techniques. Students become acquainted with all aspects of the business side of producing as creative ideas proceed to be: acquired, developed, budgeted, pitched, licensed by broadcasters, financed, produced, posted, marketed, and distributed. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus for BDC 908

BDC 909 Business Aspects of Independent Production II
This course builds on the business skills and production strategies developed in BDC 908/MP 8908. Students work in teams to develop a professional creative, business, financing and production plan for an independent production. The proposals are then competitively pitched to a panel of industry insiders including broadcasters, financiers and producers. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus BDC 909

BDC 910 Production Management
This course focuses on the role of the production manager in film and television. Students will become acquainted with all aspects of a production: development; pre-production; production; post-production. Topics will include legal aspects, financing, insurance, script breakdown and scheduling, budgeting, accounting and cost reports, location management, talent and crew unions, contracts, reporting mechanisms and relevant forms and paperwork as well as a review of key production personnel job descriptions and tips on getting hired. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus for BDC 910

BDC 911 Media Distribution
The distributor is essentially the producer’s sales person of a program. This course will explore the essential responsibilities of media distributors and their relationship to the producer and investors of programming. Students will learn how and where media products are sold, revenue expectations from various genre and territories, and how to successfully market and promote media products. International markets, contracting, selling, merchandising and administrative details will be reviewed. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus for BDC 911

BDC 912 Legal and Business Aspects of Interactive Media
Students will learn about the legalities on Internet regulation, website design, information collection, privacy protection, copyright and trademarks on the Internet, trade secrets, and how to determine which country’s laws apply when conducting business on the Internet over national borders. They will also learn what to insist on and what to avoid in contracts, and will learn about on-line payment systems and electronic signatures. (3 hours)

BDC 913 Media Entrepreneurship
Media industry transformation is affecting media careers and employment. Traditionally, media graduates find salaried employment in the corporate or public sector, or work as self-employed freelancers. BDC 913 assists media students to develop entrepreneurial options for themselves in the media industry, focusing on growth-oriented business venturing. In the first half of the course, students are introduced to entrepreneurship and business venturing. In the second half of the course, each student develops a business plan for a media startup. (3 hours) Antirequisites: ENT 500, ENT 726 Course Syllabus BDC 913

BDC 914 Economics of Media
As the broadcasting and new media industries evolve, old forms of management may give way to new structures. This course will explore trends in entrepreneurship, employment, types of “work” and different management styles in a world of mergers, consolidation and networks. Within different models, the financiers and economic models that support the industry will be reviewed. (3 hours) View most recent course syllabus

BDC 915 Legal Issues in Media
This course will provide students with a general familiarity and understanding of the concepts and legal process inherent in the business of broadcasting and communications. Topics to be covered include copyright, contracts, clearance of program rights, legal issues relating to the Internet and multimedia. Issues in entertainment law and sports law will also be reviewed, as will government regulation of the broadcasting and multimedia industries. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus BDC 915

BDC 916 Issues in Communications
This course provides the student with the opportunity to demonstrate in-depth knowledge of contextual analysis. Very current material is dealt with at a senior level. One-on-one tutorials, which “defend” written essays of work dealing with effects in the media, provide the opportunity for complex exploration of issues. (3 hours)

BDC 917 Public Relations
This course provides students with a broad understanding of the functions and capabilities of Public Relations in today’s complex media world. Public Relations theories will be illustrated via case studies of current PR campaigns. Practical activities include designing a campaign to give students a basic set of skills in this profession including writing, planning, execution and follow through. Practitioners specializing in various public and industrial situations will provide expert input. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus BDC 917

BDC 918 Ethics in Media
This course explores ethical and legal case studies in a business context, analyzing problems that arise in typical broadcasting and new media environments. The student’s responsibility to society and the ethical choices they will be required to make are compared to the legal framework (both regulatory and statutory) within which they will be working. (3 hours) Course Syllabus for BDC 918

BDC 919 Media Research – Theory and Practice
This advanced course will build on work begun in BDC 310. Moving on from the broad theoretical framework of media research, students will be provided with specific analytical and conceptual tools needed to undertake a major research project on media-related issues. In the theoretical component, particular emphasis will be placed on methodology. On a more practical level, research projects will afford students the opportunity to examine a specific aspect of the media industry. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 310

BDC 920 Media Restoration and Content Management
Students will examine contemporary practice in media archival systems used in the audio, video and film sectors, both analog and digital. Students will also be exposed to digital preservation and restoration tools used for sound recordings and moving image media. Modern practice in digital content management and metadata systems will be explored, as well as the associated commercial, legal, ethical and aesthetic issues related to repurposing media. (3 hours)

BDC 921 Advanced Audio Theory
This course is an exploration of Audio Theory for advanced applications. The course will cover modern audio practice as it applies to sound recording studios, live sound and sound reinforcement systems, acoustics and room and studio design, electronic and digital circuits and systems, computer applications in audio as well as Digital Signal Processing and compression systems and technology. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 301  Course Syllabus BDC 921

BDC 922 Business Case Studies in Communications
Students will conduct case studies exploring particular aspects of Canada’s broadcasting systems. They will focus on how components of the broadcasting system function and on proposals for reform. Areas of study will include the Broadcasting Act, the CRTC, fragmentation and new technologies, Canadian content, community radio etc. Students will present their findings in class and lead discussion on their particular subject. They will also explain that makes their individual research important in the broader context. (3 hours)

BDC 923 Music Publishing
This course will examine all aspects of music publishing, including the history of music publishing, how publishing companies operate, how music is exploited in film and television, Canadian copyright law as it relates to music, and how music copyrights generate revenue and are collected around the world. Topics include copyright law, publishing contracts, the role of the publisher, and collection agencies. It will also explore the roles of publishers, sub-publishers, songwriters and industry organizations. (3 hours) Course Syllabus for BDC 923

BDC 924 Decoding Canadian Television
From This Hour Has Seven Days to This Hour Has 22 Minutes, Canadian television has its own unique set of nationalist practices. This theory-based course comprises a broad-ranging and multi-genre look at Canadian television content form the 1960′s to the 21st century, including ways that audiences interact with national broadcasting. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus BDC 924

BDC 925 Issues in Popular Culture
Cellphones. Fandom. Shopping Malls. Blogging. These are just some case studies that may be examined. Using communications theory, cultural studies and discourse analysis, we will explore popular culture in its roles as shaper of national identity, as gendered discourse, as tool for interactivity. Particular emphasis will be on digital media and its relation to celebrity, gender, and community. Lectures supplemented with TV clips, films, online materials, and media art. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus for BDC 925

BDC 926 Studies in Genre: Drama
Drama provides a medium for exploration, social criticism, celebration and entertainment. It enables individuals to define and shape their identities within social and cultural contexts. Students will study the drama genre as it manifests in television, radio and digital media and will gain a deeper understanding of the nature of drama by engaging with theorists such as Aristotle, Joseph Campbell, David Mamet and Linda Kutcheon. Areas of study will include drama’s evolution and conventions, drama sub-genres, and parody. (3 hours)

BDC 927 Business of Music 1
This course will explore the history of the music business, music industry organization and the roles of record companies, publishers, songwriters, unions and managers.  Topics include A and R,
marketing, promotion, sales, business affairs, finance and the use of music in film, TV, and advertising. (3 hours) Course Syllabus BDC 927

BDC 928 Gaming Theory Practice
Computer games are increasingly recognized as important objects of cultural value. This class will look at how computer and console games are made, why they are made, and how users interpret and respond to them.  This course will include discussions of formal game theory, the cultural theory and history surrounding computer games, as well as studies in issues regarding
3D modeling, animation, design and development of interactive narratives and storytelling, mobile gaming, and gaming in various online systems.   (3 hours)   Course Syllabus BDC928
BDC 940 Media Writing III
This course will provide an introduction to the underlying principles of dramatic theory. In a series of lectures, readings, and presentations by in-class guests, students will learn classic story structure models. Students will engage in a detailed study of an existing television series and, through a number of specific exercises, determine how the principles of dramatic theory are put into practice. Students will develop stories for potential episodes of their chosen series. (3 hours) Prerequisites: BDC 102 and BDC 202

BDC 941 Dramatic Writing
This course will provide an advanced study of dramatic theory and the opportunity to further develop students’ abilities as story tellers. A series of advanced lectures, readings and workshops will build on the theoretical foundations and course work completed by students in BDC 940. Students will develop an original concept for either a half-hour or one-hour television series, and create a Writer’s Bible and sample script for their projects. (3 hours) Prerequisites: BDC 102 and BDC 202  Course Syllabus BDC 941

BDC 942 Commercial Writing
The primary objective of this course is to hone the student’s writing ability in developing advertising strategies. Apart from learning the main components of the advertising strategy, students will: 1) understand and master the use of secondary data to define target markets and develop advertising strategies; 2) develop skills to evaluate consumers and their indigenous needs and then apply them to create effective and persuasive strategies. (3 hours) Prerequisites: BDC 102 and BDC 202  Course Course Syllabus for BDC 942

BDC 943 Comedic Writing
This course is designed to cover the fundamentals of all comedy writing with special reference to the techniques of writing comedy for television, particularly episodic sitcoms and Saturday Night Live-type sketches. Students learn the language and process of TV comedy and are required to write a number of sketches and a fully realized script for an on-air sitcom. (3 hours) Prerequisites: BDC 102 and BDC 202  Course Syllabus for BDC 943

BDC 944 Writing for Animation
This course is designed to cover the fundamentals of writing for animated television series. Students will learn the language and process of writing for animation, and also meet with guests from the animation industry who will share their experiences and answer any questions students may have. Finally, students will be required either work in pairs, or alone, to create a fully realized animated script by the end of the semester. (3 hours) Prerequisites: BDC 102 and BDC 202  Course Syllabus for BDC 944

BDC 945 Writing for Factual Programs
In this course students will learn writing styles related to news, current affairs, science, business and other fact based programming. Through lectures, guest speakers, in class workshops and extensive writing and re-writing practice, students will develop an understanding of the structures and formats specific to fact based writing. Students will work both alone and with a writing partner to research, develop and write a number of current, fact based scripts. (3 hours) Prerequisites: BDC 102 and BDC 202  Course Syllabus for BDC 945

BDC 946 Interactive Writing
This course provides a general overview of the burgeoning field of writing for new media and the interactive devices that are finding their way onto market. Whether their goal is to write for interactive television, CD/DVD-ROM, or the Web, this introductory workshop will provide students with the essential skills and techniques necessary to make their ideas both interactive and compelling. (3 hours) Prerequisites: BDC 102 and BDC 202

BDC 947 Special Project: Writing
In this intensive student-centered course, a student has the option to pursue one of several advanced level options by developing a major project for television, radio, motion picture or interactive media. Creative elements will be determined in consultation with the faculty, and students are expected to deliver material at a professional level. With faculty permission, non-traditional writing projects pitched at a similarly advanced level will also be considered for credit in this course on a case-by case basis. (3 hours) Prerequisites: BDC 102 and BDC 202  Course Syllabus for BDC 947

BDC 951 Broadcast Presentation I
In this course, students will learn to develop their on-air presentation skills. They will present stories, news and commentaries both on-camera and behind the microphone, and through a series of exercises develop interviewing, stand up and co-hosting skills. Students will also do research into the performance life of a professional broadcaster. Exercises are supplemented with guest lectures from broadcast professionals. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus BDC 951

BDC 952 Broadcast Presentation II
Students will use the skills they developed in BDC 952 to write and produce a series of their own presentation segments for a ‘demo reel’ or ‘audition tape’. A number of guest speakers, who are program producers, will mentor the students through the process. The students will learn how to market their produced tapes to producers. (3 hours) Course Syllabus BDC 952 Prerequisite: BDC 951

BDC 953 Post-Production Supervising
This course explores the mixture of artistic and creative skills (audio and video), business-oriented skills (such as budgeting and scheduling) and sophisticated technical skills. A series of lectures by professionals, as well as tours of local professional facilities. The course will culminate in hands-on opportunity to apply this knowledge to a small audio and video production. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 303 or BDC 304 or BDC 988

BDC 955 Sports Broadcasting
This course examines programming philosophy, acquisition of rights, budgeting and the production of sports programs, and will include an opportunity to script and produce a sports property. The course will explore different types of programming including feature production, live-event coverage and interactive Web-based production. It will discuss the behind the scenes responsibilities of executives, editorial staff and technical crews. The course will discuss on air-performance as well as visual presentation in both traditional and interactive environments. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 301 or BDC 303 or BDC 304  Course Syllabus BDC 955

BDC 956 Children’s Television
Using hands on production workshops, the course explores the social, regulatory, commercial and educational forces that influence children’s programming. The course considers children’s developmental stages, their media interests and needs and delves into contemporary children’s television techniques so that students may better understand the impact children’s television has on the lives of children. Students produce TV segments for carefully targeted audiences. Students also conduct original research into one or more issues of children’s television. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus BDC 956

BDC 957 Documentary Production
This production course will help students develop an understanding of and appreciation for the documentary genre. In addition to lectures and screenings, students participate in discussion groups and presentations, and will produce an original, fact-based documentary that includes a transmedia plan. Students will develop basic competency in documentary pre-production, production and post-production practices, acquire an introductory understanding of business and marketing strategies, and become familiar with some of the major theoretical issues associated with documentary. (3 hours) Prerequisites: BDC 301 or BDC 302 or BDC 303 or BDC 304  Course Syllabus BDC 957

BDC 958 Comedic Television Production
The course will explore the production of sitcoms, sketch comedy and comedic talk shows. After analyzing the structure of these genres, students will develop scripts and produce examples of comedic television. The course will explore the business and technical requirements as well as the writing and production opportunities in this field. Student will have an opportunity to research comedic performers, producers and writers as well as develop their own skills in these areas. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 303 or BDC 304  Course Syllabus BDC 958

BDC 960 Selected Topics in International Media
This course focuses on cross-cultural and/or international topics related to media. Topics offered in any semester will be determined by faculty expertise available. Registration may be limited to students in a specific year of the program and may require the Instructor’s permission or a prerequisite at the Department’s discretion. Enrolment numbers may also be limited. May not be offered every year. Lect: 3 hrs. Course Weight: 1.00 Billing Units: 1 Course Syllabus BDC 960

BDC 961 2-D and Object Animation

This course is an introduction to the world of 2-D animation and stop-frame object animation. It will include discussion of the history and aesthetic aspects of animation and also allow students to produce their own pieces. Equipment and software for simple animated projects will be introduced, and film, video, new media and interactive forms of delivery will be discussed. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 101 or BDC 192  Course Syllabus for BDC 961

BDC 962 3-D Animation
This production oriented course will allow students to work with computer software to develop 3-D models and animated stories, starting from the concept, and moving to storyboard, an finally a fully-rendered production. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of software and technology and will study the role of 3-D animation in the advertising, TV and movie business. (3 hours)

BDC 963 Digital Graphic and Web Design
This course explores graphic and web design from an aesthetic and functional point of view. Students will learn about the software and technology needed to acquire, manipulate and render effective visual images, and will experience the planning, production, and launch of a web site, using the latest web design and management software. Designing for human usability will be discussed as well as limitations of technology in order to maximize the impact of the creative material. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 101 or BDC 192  Course Syllabus for BDC 963

BDC 964 Digital Virtual Environments
This course covers developing practices, cultures and technologies at the intersection of digital and real-world production. Students will discuss and create within Virtual Worlds, Augmented Reality, virtual characters/sets and location-aware content, analyzing developing trends and creating innovative cross-media content. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 101 or BDC 192  Course Syllabus BDC 964

BDC 971 Set Design
In this period of transition between standard and High-definition television, new skills and techniques will have to be acquired and practiced to approach on screen realism. In this course, students will learn effective construction techniques and the proper rigging of traditional set materials while exploring the software and hardware necessary to create virtual digital environments on the screen. Aspects of the set design industry will be examined including financial, creative and technical requirements. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 201

BDC 972 Television Technical Producing
An advanced course in television technical producing, this course is a continuation of technical production knowledge obtained in first year “context” courses and second year Production craft courses in television (both studio and EFP). Students will explore large live-event coverage (sports, elections, music specials, awards shows), and tours will be arranged to some technical production facilities in the Toronto area. The course is completed with a live teleproduction at the end of the semester. (3 hours) Prerequisites: BDC 211 and BDC 303  Course Syllabus BDC 972

BDC 973 Lighting, Grip and Effects Specialty
Lighting and special effects technicians work behind the scenes to add realism or dramatic effect to a television production. This course will engage the student in theoretical and practical aspects of this element of production. Emphasis will be on the aesthetics, professionalism, discipline, technical ability, equipment and safety considerations necessary to achieve the desired results. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 303 or BDC 304   Course Syllabus for BDC 973

BDC 974 Audio Post-Production and Sound Design
This course will introduce students to the creative and technical aspects of creating a soundtrack for the moving image. Through a combination of lecture, screenings, discussion, and practical workshop modes, students will learn about the audio post production process, including dialog recording and replacement (ADR), Foley and sound effects editing, music and score, and mixing techniques. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 101 or BDC 191 Course Syllabus BDC 974

BDC 975 Sound Synthesis
This course will cover practices and principles of analog and digital sound synthesis and their historic origins; related audio equipment and applications; theories of sound samplers; algorithmic composition; synthesizers and sequencers; computer music; digital signal processing; computer synchronization; and MIDI applications in sound synthesis and recording production. Advanced sound synthesis techniques are studied and supplemented with sound synthesis studio laboratory work. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 301  Course Syllabus for BDC 975

BDC 976 Independent Project: Media Production
Students are given the opportunity to prepare and produce professional level programs following a carefully designed planning process. Students may elect to produce audio, video or interactive material, and all RTA resources – studios, portable field equipment, and editing facilities – are available in limited quantities. The focus in this course is on individual students creating professional-level productions that may not fit within the constraints of the small-group oriented Practicum courses in fourth year. Enrollment is open to students in upper years only. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 301 or BDC 302 or BDC 303 or BDC 304  Course Syllabus BDC 976

BDC 977 Digital Media Broadcasting
In this hands-on-course, students will be responsible for managing Ryerson’s internet broadcasting station, known as SPIRIT ( Student Produced Internet Radio and Interactive Technologies) and/or programming a channel on the video distribution system within Ryerson, known as Channel 84. Students will undertake varying roles including: managing the stations in terms of personnel; creating programming; arranging rights clearance for external productions; scheduling; liaising with other University courses which create potential programming; managing community outreach initiatives; and management of the technical facilities. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 101 or BDC 191  Course Syllabus for BDC 977

BDC 979 Radio Production
The course will explore commercial and public radio programming and production. Radio advertising and formats will be explored. Students will have the opportunity to practice their skills in these areas by planning and producing content that reflects various formats and target demographics. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 101 or BDC 191  Course Syllabus BDC 979

BDC 980 Art Direction
The fabrication of reality for the screen is up to the Art Director, who created the on-screen environment that meets the director’s aesthetic while being aware of the needs of the camera and lighting, and completes the whole by being responsible for all of a production’s graphical elements. This course introduces students to both the theory and practice of art direction through guided exercises and work on student productions. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 101 or BDC 192  Course Syllabus for BDC 980

BDC 981 PA, AD and Continuity
This course introduces students to both the theory and practice of frontline ‘assistant directing’ through guided exercises and work on student productions. The activities range from taking notes during rehearsals to performing semi directorial duties in the video control room. In single camera shooting, roles include organizing the shooting of scenes on location and scheduling the talent and production staff. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 201

BDC 982 Video Compositing and Special Effects
A large number of images that appear on our TV screens are treated with special effects prior to completion. Students will work with a range of basic image treatment software and will acquire skills on more sophisticated systems both on and off campus. They will learn the why and when for such effects treatments as special effects decisions can involve ethical elements. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 302 or BDC 303 or BDC 304  Course Syllabus BDC 982

BDC 983 Radio Broadcast Journalism
This course combines an introductory theory package with extensive practice. The theory covers story structure, shaping the language for the ear, the value and purpose of original sound and interview segments, journalistic conventions, reporting procedures and the law as it applies to daily news functions. The majority of the term is designed to allow students to undertake newsroom tasks and roles on a rotating basis. Each lab session culminates in a radio newscast. (3 hours) Corequisite: BDC 903  Course Syllabus for BDC 983

BDC 984 TV Broadcast Journalism
Following a structural analysis of a typical television news broadcast, each major element is dissected via lecture and practiced in a small workshop environment. Typical elements include broadcast news writing, researching, reporting, visual story telling, video editing to deadline, producing assignment and line up editing. Over the term, students are introduced to the wide range of roles and are given many opportunities to build a repertoire of practical experiences in a TV newsroom setting. (3 hours) Corequisite: BDC 903  Course Syllabus BDC 984

BDC 985 Factual and Entertainment Features
There is a broad spectrum of stories on television and radio that are fact-based but also meant to be artistic and entertaining. This course allows students to focus on these features, learning to create unique personal stories by developing the characters in their stories through specific styles of writing and interviewing. Students will choose an entertainment/feature program and do an extensive deconstruction of it. Students will work in teams to produce a ten minute feature. (3 hours)  Course Syllabus for BDC 985

BDC 986 Creative Commercial Production
Advertising is at the core of private broadcasting in Canada. The focus of this course will be on producing work that breaks through the commonplace. The major emphasis will be on local commercials as major international corporations are frequently producing their product elsewhere. Course work will include determining selling points and client needs, writing techniques, analysing current media, deconstruction award winning ads and producing sample commercials. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 301 or BDC 302 or BDC 303 or BDC 304

BDC 987 Corporate Media Production
Internal communications is a growing aspect of many businesses and this will be the principle focus of this course. Production is the final stage of a process which would include assessing the company and employee needs, determining the best media format to use to accomplish the communications, designing the communications plan and executing samples of product and measuring the impact of the work on the intended audience. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 301 or BDC 302 or BDC 303 or BDC 304

BDC 988 Television Editing Specialty
This is an in-depth course designed to provide a thorough understanding of the video editing process. Through exercises, the process is followed from the initial planning stages to the final online edit session. Timecode and cue sheeting processes will be used to assemble elements in a professional nonlinear editing environment. (3 hours) Prerequisite: BDC 304  Course Syllabus BDC 988